Some Paintings of Kashmir (1760-1886)

Some of the paintings of Kashmir made by outsiders between 1760 to 1886. For description, click on the image.

Sheik Imam-Ud-Din, Runjur Sing, and Dewan Dina Nath by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Sheik Imam-Ud-Din, Runjur Sing, and Dewan Dina Nath by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Village life in Kashmir by Mir Kalan Khan, working in the Lucknow/Faizabad style, Year 1760.

Village life in Kashmir by Mir Kalan Khan, working in the Lucknow/Faizabad style, Year 1760.

Bijbehara by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Bijbehara by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Mosque of Shah Hamadan by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Mosque of Shah Hamadan by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Wular Lake by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Wular Lake by James Duffield Harding in 1847

This chromolithograph is taken from William Simpson's 'India: Ancient and Modern' . Year 1867. It illustrates the return visit made by Viceroy Lord Canning to Maharaja Ranbir Singh of Kashmir on 9 March 1860, during the viceroy's progress through upper India. The Maharaja had come to meet him a day earlier. The Maharaja's tent was decorated with cashmere shawls, and silk and gold materials were placed beneath the chair reserved for the viceroy.

This chromolithograph is taken from William Simpson’s ‘India: Ancient and Modern’ . Year 1867. It illustrates the return visit made by Viceroy Lord Canning to Maharaja Ranbir Singh of Kashmir on 9 March 1860, during the viceroy’s progress through upper India. The Maharaja had come to meet him a day earlier. The Maharaja’s tent was decorated with cashmere shawls, and silk and gold materials were placed beneath the chair reserved for the viceroy.

Water-colour painting of the source of the River Jhelum in an octagonal tank at Verinag (Kashmir) by Charles J. Cramer-Roberts (1834-1895) in 1886. .'The spring is situated approximately 80 kilometres from Srinagar at an altitude of 1,876 metres and is believed to be the chief source of the Jhelum River. It was originally enclosed by a circular wall with a circumference of 80 metres. The emperor Jahangir (r. 1605-1627) had the shape changed to the favoured Mughal octagon in 1620.

Water-colour painting of the source of the River Jhelum in an octagonal tank at Verinag (Kashmir) by Charles J. Cramer-Roberts (1834-1895) in 1886. .’The spring is situated approximately 80 kilometres from Srinagar at an altitude of 1,876 metres and is believed to be the chief source of the Jhelum River. It was originally enclosed by a circular wall with a circumference of 80 metres. The emperor Jahangir (r. 1605-1627) had the shape changed to the favoured Mughal octagon in 1620.

Water-colour painting of a ruined temple at Boniar by Charles J. Cramer-Roberts 1876

Water-colour painting of a ruined temple at Boniar by Charles J. Cramer-Roberts 1876

Udhampur by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Udhampur by James Duffield Harding in 1847

Water-colour painting of Rajaori in Ladakh, Jammu and Kashmir by Charles J. Cramer-Roberts (1834-1895) in 1886.

Water-colour painting of Rajaori in Ladakh, Jammu and Kashmir by Charles J. Cramer-Roberts (1834-1895) in 1886.

Jammu by James Duffield Harding in 1847. This depicts a view of Jammu with the residence of Maharaja Gulab Singh on the banks of a tributary to the Chenab with mountains in the background and a hunting party in the foreground.

Jammu by James Duffield Harding in 1847. This depicts a view of Jammu with the residence of Maharaja Gulab Singh on the banks of a tributary to the Chenab with mountains in the background and a hunting party in the foreground.

Kashmir Shawl Factory - This chromolithograph is taken from William Simpson's 'India: Ancient and Modern' . Year 1867

Kashmir Shawl Factory – This chromolithograph is taken from William Simpson’s ‘India: Ancient and Modern’ . Year 1867

                                                           

 
Source : British Library

 

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